Nuclear Disarmament

questions-on-notice

Uranium sales to NPT states

29 Apr 2011

Question No. 335Senator Ludlam asked the Minister representing the Minister for Foreign Affairs, upon notice, on 6 December 2010:In regard to the potential sale of Australian uranium to Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) states:(1) Has the department or the Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office (ASNO) undertaken any consideration or prepared any advice since 2007 on the potential sale of Australian uranium to states that do not observe the NPT; if so, what has been the cost of that work.

Question No. 335

Senator Ludlam asked the Minister representing the Minister for Foreign Affairs, upon notice, on 6 December 2010:
In regard to the potential sale of Australian uranium to Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) states:
(1) Has the department or the Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office (ASNO) undertaken any consideration or prepared any advice since 2007 on the potential sale of Australian uranium to states that do not observe the NPT; if so, what has been the cost of that work.

media-releases

25 years on: lessons of Chernobyl still ignored by supporters of nuclear power

26 Apr 2011

PERTH RALLY: 2:30 - 4:30pm WST Tuesday April 26, 2011 - Forest Place Perth On the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, the Australian Greens have renewed demands for a phase-out of uranium mining and nuclear power. Greens nuclear affairs spokesperson, Senator for Western Australia Scott Ludlam, said the Chernobyl catastrophe was classified as a level 7 event on the International Nuclear Event Scale - the same classification given to the Fukushima nuclear disaster now unfolding in Japan. "Communities around the world are today remembering the terrible consequences of the Chernobyl meltdown, which spread radioactive fallout around the northern hemisphere and forced the evacuation of 350,000 people," Senator Scott Ludlam said. "There is a dark irony in the fact that even as we pause to remember Chernobyl, the nuclear industry is in the midst of another disaster in Japan." "Nuclear power advocates need to ask themselves if they really believe this will be the last time this happens, or if they too have grave fears about the 436 obsolete and uninsurable nuclear power stations dotted around the world." "Today I join with civil society groups and governments around the world with grave concerns to demand an end to this toxic and unnecessary industry." Media Contact: Giovanni Torre - 0417 174 302    

PERTH RALLY: 2:30 - 4:30pm WST Tuesday April 26, 2011 - Forest Place Perth

On the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, the Australian Greens have renewed demands for a phase-out of uranium mining and nuclear power.

Greens nuclear affairs spokesperson, Senator for Western Australia Scott Ludlam, said the Chernobyl catastrophe was classified as a level 7 event on the International Nuclear Event Scale - the same classification given to the Fukushima nuclear disaster now unfolding in Japan.

"Communities around the world are today remembering the terrible consequences of the Chernobyl meltdown, which spread radioactive fallout around the northern hemisphere and forced the evacuation of 350,000 people," Senator Scott Ludlam said.

"There is a dark irony in the fact that even as we pause to remember Chernobyl, the nuclear industry is in the midst of another disaster in Japan."

"Nuclear power advocates need to ask themselves if they really believe this will be the last time this happens, or if they too have grave fears about the 436 obsolete and uninsurable nuclear power stations dotted around the world."

"Today I join with civil society groups and governments around the world with grave concerns to demand an end to this toxic and unnecessary industry."


Media Contact: Giovanni Torre - 0417 174 302

 

 

media-releases

Emirates the latest blunder in Government’s uranium free-for-all

09 Mar 2011

The Australian Greens have criticised the Federal Government's moves towards selling uranium to the United Arab Emirates. Greens nuclear affairs spokesperson Senator Scott Ludlam said the government should publish a list of countries to which it won't sell uranium. "Apart from North Korea, is there any country this government has ruled out as a uranium customer? India refuses to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, but we know the resources minister is pushing for sales to India. Iran seems an obvious one, but the government cut a uranium deal with Russia - and Russia is assisting Iran's nuclear program," said Senator Ludlam. "Whatever assurances the UAE Government gives, can we trust a regime that denies its people basic political and human rights?" "The government of the United Arab Emirates is a dictatorship and is not accountable to its people in any way," said Senator Ludlam. "This continues the pattern of successive Australian Governments in allowing the agenda of the uranium industry to override our national security and non-proliferation interests. The uranium mining industry has long been amoral in its choice of customers; the Australian Government on the other hand is supposed to represent a broader constituency."

The Australian Greens have criticised the Federal Government's moves towards selling uranium to the United Arab Emirates.

Greens nuclear affairs spokesperson Senator Scott Ludlam said the government should publish a list of countries to which it won't sell uranium.

"Apart from North Korea, is there any country this government has ruled out as a uranium customer? India refuses to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, but we know the resources minister is pushing for sales to India. Iran seems an obvious one, but the government cut a uranium deal with Russia - and Russia is assisting Iran's nuclear program," said Senator Ludlam. "Whatever assurances the UAE Government gives, can we trust a regime that denies its people basic political and human rights?"

"The government of the United Arab Emirates is a dictatorship and is not accountable to its people in any way," said Senator Ludlam. "This continues the pattern of successive Australian Governments in allowing the agenda of the uranium industry to override our national security and non-proliferation interests. The uranium mining industry has long been amoral in its choice of customers; the Australian Government on the other hand is supposed to represent a broader constituency."

media-releases

Government must reject Minister’s uranium obsession

16 Feb 2011

The Australian Greens have urged the Federal Government to reject the push by resources minister Martin Ferguson to sell uranium to India. Greens nuclear affairs spokesperson Senator Scott Ludlam said the notion that nuclear fuel should be sold to a nuclear weapons state that refused to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty was "extreme". "The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is the cornerstone of international disarmament negotiations. India has refused to sign it, and for this reason Australia has refused to sell uranium to that country," he said.

The Australian Greens have urged the Federal Government to reject the push by resources minister Martin Ferguson to sell uranium to India.

Greens nuclear affairs spokesperson Senator Scott Ludlam said the notion that nuclear fuel should be sold to a nuclear weapons state that refused to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty was "extreme".

"The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is the cornerstone of international disarmament negotiations. India has refused to sign it, and for this reason Australia has refused to sell uranium to that country," he said.

questions-on-notice

IPPNW call for uranium ban worldwide

11 Feb 2011

QUESTION NUMBER 362SENATOR LUDLAM asked the Minister representing the Minister for Health and Ageing, upon notice, on 17 November 2010:With reference to the resolution passed at the September 2010 Congress of the Nobel Peace Prize winning International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) in Basel, Switzerland, calling for an end to uranium mining on human rights and public health grounds stating:

QUESTION NUMBER 362

SENATOR LUDLAM asked the Minister representing the Minister for Health and Ageing, upon notice, on 17 November 2010:

With reference to the resolution passed at the September 2010 Congress of the Nobel Peace Prize winning International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) in Basel, Switzerland, calling for an end to uranium mining on human rights and public health grounds stating:

news-stories

Speech on 30-year US Uranium deal

10 Feb 2011

 Senator Ludlam's speech on the 30 year agreement on uranium exports with the US on 9 February 2011.

 

Senator Ludlam's speech on the 30 year agreement on uranium exports with the US on 9 February 2011.

media-releases

Minister must publicly reveal true position on uranium sales to India

10 Feb 2011

The Australian Greens have called on resources Minister Martin Ferguson to make a statement to Parliament on his policy on uranium sales to India, and whether it differs from that of the Australian Government. Greens spokesperson for nuclear affairs Senator Scott Ludlam said the Government had recently reaffirmed it would not sell uranium to a country that was not a signatory of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, but leaked documents suggested that Minister Ferguson had different plans.

The Australian Greens have called on resources Minister Martin Ferguson to make a statement to Parliament on his policy on uranium sales to India, and whether it differs from that of the Australian Government.

Greens spokesperson for nuclear affairs Senator Scott Ludlam said the Government had recently reaffirmed it would not sell uranium to a country that was not a signatory of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, but leaked documents suggested that Minister Ferguson had different plans.

media-releases

Greens urge Labor to maintain principled stand on selling uranium to India

20 Jan 2011

The Greens have applauded the decision of the Federal Government to reject the Indian government's call for an end to Australia's ban on selling uranium to India. Australian Greens spokesperson for nuclear affairs Senator Scott Ludlam said there should be "absolutely no contemplation" of Australia selling uranium to countries that have not signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

The Greens have applauded the decision of the Federal Government to reject the Indian government's call for an end to Australia's ban on selling uranium to India.

Australian Greens spokesperson for nuclear affairs Senator Scott Ludlam said there should be "absolutely no contemplation" of Australia selling uranium to countries that have not signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

media-releases

Do the right thing by veterans

24 Nov 2010

The Australian Greens have called on the Australian Government to properly compensate the victims of the atomic testing at Maralinga. The Greens spokesperson for nuclear issues and legal affairs, Senator Scott Ludlam, said the hopes of Australian veterans for compensation for exposure to nuclear testing in the 1950s had been undermined by a decision of the British Court of Appeal.

The Australian Greens have called on the Australian Government to properly compensate the victims of the atomic testing at Maralinga.

The Greens spokesperson for nuclear issues and legal affairs, Senator Scott Ludlam, said the hopes of Australian veterans for compensation for exposure to nuclear testing in the 1950s had been undermined by a decision of the British Court of Appeal.

speeches-in-parliament

Address in Reply to the Governor-General's speech

16 Nov 2010

Senator LUDLAM (Western Australia) (9:37 PM) - The Governor-General's speech, which this debate addresses and which was some time ago now, I found quite fascinating. It is only my second experience of an address-in-reply in my brief time here, being halfway through the term. I listened to the speech quite intently, partly because it is an expression of what the government is most proud of and because it is an indication of the agenda they are setting for the next couple of years. But I was also listening most acutely to hear what was not in the speech-what the government is doing, what its agenda is and what legislation it pursues that did not make its way into the speech-because I think that will probably tell us a little about what the government is up to that it is not proud of.So, considering the kind of day that I have had, I am probably going to focus somewhat on the negative. But isn't it interesting that there was nothing in the speech on the proposal for mandatory filtering of the internet? There was nothing in it on what we witnessed this afternoon, the entrenchment and furthering of the laws of terror. There was nothing in it on data retention, the Attorney-General's proposal to start logging all the material and traces that people leave behind in web traffic and email and so on. But, most strikingly, there was nothing in the speech, nothing that any of the relevant ministers had sought to put forward, about how we were about to outsource our foreign policy to uranium-mining companies for the short-term interests of the nuclear industry here and overseas.

Senator LUDLAM (Western Australia) (9:37 PM) - The Governor-General's speech, which this debate addresses and which was some time ago now, I found quite fascinating. It is only my second experience of an address-in-reply in my brief time here, being halfway through the term. I listened to the speech quite intently, partly because it is an expression of what the government is most proud of and because it is an indication of the agenda they are setting for the next couple of years. But I was also listening most acutely to hear what was not in the speech-what the government is doing, what its agenda is and what legislation it pursues that did not make its way into the speech-because I think that will probably tell us a little about what the government is up to that it is not proud of.

So, considering the kind of day that I have had, I am probably going to focus somewhat on the negative. But isn't it interesting that there was nothing in the speech on the proposal for mandatory filtering of the internet? There was nothing in it on what we witnessed this afternoon, the entrenchment and furthering of the laws of terror. There was nothing in it on data retention, the Attorney-General's proposal to start logging all the material and traces that people leave behind in web traffic and email and so on. But, most strikingly, there was nothing in the speech, nothing that any of the relevant ministers had sought to put forward, about how we were about to outsource our foreign policy to uranium-mining companies for the short-term interests of the nuclear industry here and overseas.

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